Quilling

                Quilling is a delightfully fun paper craft. There are a ton of amazing designs out there and ways to use the techniques. They are delicate, unique and personal, which is something we all strive for in paper crafts. You will need a number of quilling materials, which you can get from this amazing shop in Singapore. We will go more into detail about these items, but there’s the slotted curler, paper strips, glue, tweezers, toothpicks, pins, a ruler and a work board. In addition, you will need to learn the husking technique that is necessary to ensure that you are quilling properly.

Quilling Materials and Techniques

                The slotted curling tool is the most important one to have in your quilling kit. This item allows you to curl paper strips into the coils you’re after, as well as the shapes you plan to use further along in your creations. You can buy one online, at an art store or simply create on using a toothpick or a needle. The quilling paper strips are what you will be using for your specific project. 1/8 of an inch is the most common width for such strips. Pre-made strips are consistent, saving you time in your project. You will need high quality glue. Higher quality glues don’t ruin your works or run all over the place. Experiment with different glues with smaller projects to find what is best for you and your projects. These are three main necessities of quilling.

                If you want to make your work system simple, get a work board. A work board can be made or purchased depending on your preference. It’s ideal to shield your board with plastic, wax paper or something similar to prevent your quilling from sticking and damaging the board. The plastic can also make it easier to clean and to improve durability. Tweezers will improve your ability to maneuver and arrange the smaller pieces of your project. Toothpicks allow you to apply glue in smaller portions for the smaller pieces. Straight pins can be used to pin the scrolls into place on your board, as well as for husking. Finally, rulers can make it easier to follow patterns.

Husking

                This technique allows to you recreate your pattern or shapes through pins while the strips are coiled around them. You can use this to create multiples of the same design, since you are able to leave the pins where they are. Husking is often used for more complicated and detailed patterns rather than simple ones, as it allows you to maintain key positions.

Quilling for Beginners

                While in theory it is cheaper for beginners to pick up a quilling kit, which has everything necessary to start off, many professionals suggest starting with just paper and glue. Try it out, and play around with it before picking up additional tools. Once you’ve produced a few pieces, and know if you actually enjoy doing it, the kit may very well be worth the purchase for you. These kits incorporate all the above listed tools, as well as molds that allow you to create 3D domes and foam shaping boards. These kits are great for beginners, offering everything you need at the best value.

Short Tutorial for Starting Off

                All you need for this is some basic supplies: paper strip and a toothpick/needle. For a tighter, neater coil, the slotted tool is ideal, but you can make do with a simple tool until you have a chance to get one. If you are using a slotted tool, you simple insert the paper into the slot, and turn the tool while holding the paper. Keep your tension on the paper the same. You may turn it in whichever direction works best for you. You can keep it even by placing your thumb and forefinger on either side of the paper strip. Once you reach the end, remove the tool. If you wind the paper too tightly, it will be a struggle to remove the paper. One method is to press your thumb against the tool tip’s barrel as you remove it. Or you can allow the coil to expand some before removing the tool. It is all a matter of preference and if you would like the coil to be loosely shaped.

                If you let the coil expand, leaving it open, it is referred to as a scroll. A loose circle coil can be glued shut. You can then start transforming it into different shapes. Create a tear drop shape by squeezing the top and bottom of the coil. Use your other hand to slowly pull the bottom edge into a tip. By curving the tip, you can create a curved teardrop. Experiment with different shapes.

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